Each piece is soldered and burnished, then hand painted. The result is a bunch of flowers that deliver a message, just as in Victorian times.

Contact: 603 -762-1818

2019 All Rights Reserved Floriography Jewelry

  • White Pinterest Icon
  • White RSS Icon
  • White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Facebook Icon

Site Development Petite Taway Inc

View Our Accessibility Statement, Here. The privacy and security of your personal information is very important to us so we want to assure you that your information will be properly managed and protected by us at all times. Please read this privacy notice carefully as it explains how we may collect and use your personal data.
You can read the Privacy Notice Here. Read Our Terms of Service, Here.

  • Jennifer Campbell

Celebrating Halloween and All Things Spooky



In some ways Halloween is fairly recent phenomena, and incredibly old in others. The roots of this holiday we all know and love come from around 2,500 years ago in Celtic tradition. The festival of Samhain, or Summer’s End, was celebrated on October 31 and was all about the transition between seasons and preparations for the harvest. In later years, the powers that be in the Christian church sought to bring pagans into the fold and appropriate many of their traditions and celebrations in the Christian calendar. Thus October 31 became All Hallows Eve and November first turned into All Saints Day, both of which are holidays that have to do with prayer, death and ancestor/saint worship rather than the march of time.

In the Victorian era, Halloween was mostly celebrated in the UK, but it was gaining popularity in the US by the 1870s as well. In a funny historical side-note, it was often regarded as an Irish “import” to the US because the Catholic Church was into celebrating it as a day of prayer. During this time people would sometimes go door to door in their neighborhood and sing, not unlike many Christmas traditions, and would be rewarded with festive treats. The promise of mischief if these treats weren’t delivered came later. The term “Trick or Treat” didn’t become popular until the 1920’s and is an American adaptation of the holiday.

In celebration of Halloween, Floriography would like to offer our Halloween inspired jewelry 10percent off.

#halloween